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A Beautiful Morning

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Well, I finished reading The Underground Railroad yesterday, and will most definitely be blogging about it, once I've digested it some and thought about it some more. It was, to say the least, very powerful, and not only did it made me think about the subject matter--it also made me think about a lot of other things, which I will be more than happy to discuss once I've digested them. I also started reading The Nest by Cynthia D'Aprix Sweeney, which I am enjoying as well.

We were supposed to get heavy weather yesterday, but it arrived over night instead--everything out there is wet and dripping, which is always a joy. Ah, well.

I didn't write yesterday, or at all over the weekend, which is, of course, terrible. I did get some cleaning done and some organizing--not as much as I would have liked--but we're also working on getting caught up on our shows and I did want to power through and finally finish the Colson novel, which I did manage to do, and then we got caught up on The Walking Dead, watched last night's Feud, and then it was bedtime.

I am greatly enjoying Feud, and am very impressed with how it's taking on the issue of how Hollywood/entertainment treats women; which also, in some ways, goes along with another show I am looking to finishing watching--the season finale of Big Little Lies was also last night; which we will undoubtedly watch tonight as well as continuing to get caught up on Bates Motel (a show that is KILLING it now in it's final season). The way two of my favorite old Hollywood actresses--Bette Davis and Joan Crawford--are being depicted is brilliant, and the two women playing them, Jessica Lange and Susan Sarandon, are turning in stunning, award-worthy performances. Last week's episode, in which both Davis and Crawford are still not fielding any offers before the movie opens--and then it becomes a huge hit--was particularly brilliant; the moment when Joan Crawford, leaving the theater after the preview of the film that ended with a standing ovation, is recognized in the lobby and then mobbed with fans--when this happens, the look on her face--surprise evolving into pure joy at being treated like a star again, is so poignant it's heartbreaking.




Last night's, Oscar night when Crawford was snubbed in favor of Davis, was also almost painful to watch; the naked need Davis had for that third Oscar, the pain and anguish Crawford felt about being overshadowed once again by her rival (the scenes where Crawford talks to Geraldine Page and Anne Bancroft, asking them if she can accept for them, and the pity and sympathy Page and Bancroft feel for her, agreeing to let her do it because she needs to...wow)--and Judy Davis is also killing it as Hedda Hopper.

And last night, for the first time, Catherine Zeta-Jones actually delivered as Olivia de Havilland.

I got the idea for an essay yesterday about women's fiction--using three novels to not only compare and contrast to each other but also to talk about how fiction by, for, and about women is so regularly disdained and dismissed as somehow lesser--the three being The Best of Everything by Rona Jaffe, Peyton Place by Grace Metalious, and Valley of the Dolls by Jacqueline Susann. I've been toying with the idea for quite some time, and I thought about it again yesterday, partly because of Feud, but also partly because of Big Little Lies. Of course, I have no idea where to publish the thing...and it's not like I don't have a million other things to write as well.

Heavy heaving sigh.

And on that note, back to editing.
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